The Prince of India; Or, Why Constantinople Fell — Volume 01

Produced by Anne Soulard, Naomi Parkhurst, Charles Franks
and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team. HTML version
by Al Haines.

THE PRINCE OF INDIA
OR
WHY CONSTANTINOPLE FELL

BY
LEW. WALLACE

VOL. I.

Rise, too, ye Shapes and Shadows of the Past
Rise from your long forgotten grazes at last
Let us behold your faces, let us hear
The words you uttered in those days of fear
Revisit your familiar haunts again
The scenes of triumph and the scenes of pain
And leave the footprints of your bleeding feet
Once more upon the pavement of the street

LONGFELLOW

CONTENTS

BOOK I

THE EARTH AND THE SEA ARE ALWAYS GIVING UP THEIR SECRETS

I. THE NAMELESS BAY
II. THE MIDNIGHT LANDING
III. THE HIDDEN TREASURE

BOOK II

THE PRINCE OF INDIA

I. A MESSENGER FROM CIPANGO
II. THE PILGRIM AT EL KATIF
III. THE YELLOW AIR
IV. EL ZARIBAH
V. THE PASSING OF THE CARAVAN
VI. THE PRINCE AND THE EMIR
VII. AT THE KAABA
VIII. THE ARRIVAL IN CONSTANTINOPLE
IX. THE PRINCE AT HOME
X. THE ROSE OF SPRING

BOOK III

THE PRINCESS IRENE

I. MORNING ON THE BOSPHORUS
II. THE PRINCESS IRENE
III. THE HOMERIC PALACE
IV. THE RUSSIAN MONK
V. A VOICE FROM THE CLOISTER
VI. WHAT DO THE STARS SAY?
VII. THE PRINCE OF INDIA MEETS CONSTANTINE
VIII. RACING WITH A STORM
IX. IN THE WHITE CASTLE
X. THE ARABIAN STORY-TELLER
XI. THE TURQUOISE RING
XII. THE RING RETURNS
XIII. MAHOMMED HEARS FROM THE STARS
XIV. DREAMS AND VISIONS
XV. DEPARTURE FROM THE WHITE CASTLE
XVI. AN EMBASSY TO THE PRINCESS IRENE
XVII. THE EMPEROR’S WOOING
XVIII. THE SINGING SHEIK
XIX. TWO TURKISH TALES
XX. MAHOMMED DREAMS

BOOK IV

THE PALACE OF BLACHERNE

I. THE PALACE OF BLACHERNE
II. THE AUDIENCE
III. THE NEW FAITH PROCLAIMED
IV. THE PANNYCHIDES
V. A PLAGUE OF CRIME
VI. A BYZANTINE GENTLEMAN OF THE PERIOD
VII. A BYZANTINE HERETIC
VIII. THE ACADEMY OF EPICURUS
IX. A FISHERMAN’S FETE
X. THE HAMARI

BOOK I

THE EARTH AND THE SEA ARE ALWAYS GIVING UP THEIR SECRETS

THE PRINCE OF INDIA

CHAPTER I.

THE NAMELESS BAY

In the noon of a September day in the year of our dear Lord 1395, a merchant vessel nodded sleepily upon the gentle swells of warm water flowing in upon the Syrian coast. A modern seafarer, looking from the deck of one of the Messagerie steamers now plying the same line of trade, would regard her curiously, thankful to the calm which held her while he slaked his wonder, yet more thankful that he was not of her passage.

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