Agincourt: A Romance / The Works of G. P. R. James, Volume XX

Produced by Charles Bowen, from page scans provided by
Google Books (Harvard University)

Transcriber’s Notes:

1. Page scan source:

http://books.google.com/books?id=jvMtAAAAYAAJ
(Harvard University)

agincourt

THE WORKS

OF

G. P. R. JAMES, ESQ.

REVISED AND CORRECTED BY THE AUTHOR.

WITH AN INTRODUCTORY PREFACE.

“D’autres auteurs l’ont encore plus avili, (le roman,) en y mêlant les tableaux dégoutant du vice; et tandis que le premier avantage des fictions est de rassembler autour de l’homme tout ce qui, dans la nature, peut lui servir de leçon ou de modèle, on a imaginé qu’on tirerait une utilité quelconque des peintures odieuses de mauvaises mœurs; comme si elles pouvaient jamais laisser le cœur qui les repousse, dans une situation aussi pure que le cœur qui les aurait toujours ignorées. Mais un roman tel qu’on peut le concevoir, tel que nous en avons quelques modèles, est une des plus belles productions de l’esprit humain, une des plus influentes sur la morale des individus, qui doit former ensuite les mœurs publiques.”–Madame De Stael. Essai sur les Fictions.

“Poca favilla gran flamma seconda:
Forse diretro a me, con miglior voci
Si pregherà, perchè Cirra risponda.”

Dante. Paradiso, Canto I.

VOL. XX.

AGINCOURT.

LONDON:

SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, AND CO.

STATIONERS’ HALL COURT.

MDCCCXLIX.

AGINCOURT.

A Romance.

BY

G. P. R. JAMES, ESQ.


LONDON:

SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, AND CO.

STATIONERS’ HALL COURT.

MDCCCXLIX.

CONTENTS

CHAPTER 
I.THE NIGHT RIDE.
II.THE HALL AND ITS DENIZENS.
III.THE FOREGONE EVENTS.
IV.THE GLUTTON MASS.
V.THE ASSASSINATION.
VI.THE SUSPICIONS.
VII.THE CORONATION.
VIII.THE DAY OF FESTIVAL.
IX.THE SICK MIND.
X.THE MINSTREL’S GIRL.
XI.THE DECEIVER.
XII.THE HOURS OF JOY.
XIII.THE WRONG.
XIV.THE REMEDY.
XV.THE PILGRIM.
XVI.THE NEW FRIENDS.
XVII.THE PREPARATION.
XVIII.THE JOURNEY AND THE VOYAGE.
XIX.THE FOREIGN LAND.
XX.THE NEW ACQUAINTANCES.
XXI.THE EXILE.
XXII.THE COUNT OF CHAROLOIS.
XXIII.THE DEPARTURE.
XXIV.THOSE WHO WERE LEFT BEHIND.
XXV.THE ENTERPRISE.
XXVI.THE ACHIEVEMENT.
XXVII.A SUMMARY.
XXVIII.THE FRIEND ESTRANGED.
XXIX.THE BETRAYER.
XXX.THE HUSSITES.
XXXI.THE RESULT.
XXXII.TRUE LOVE’S DEFENCE.
XXXIII.THE RESCUE.
XXXIV.THE RECOMPENCE.
XXXV.THE DISAPPOINTMENT.
XXXVI.THE DISASTER.
XXXVII.THE CAPTIVITY.
XXXVIII.THE FLIGHT.
XXXIX.THE PRISONER FREE.
XL.THE MYSTERY.
XLI.THE CAMP.
XLII.THE CHARGES.
XLIII.THE FOX IN THE SNARE.
XLIV.THE ORDERING OF THE BATTLE.
XLV.THE BATTLE.
XLVI.THE CONCLUSION.

AGINCOURT.


CHAPTER I.

THE NIGHT RIDE.

The night was as black as ink; not a solitary twinkling star looked out through that wide expanse of shadow, which our great Poet has called the “blanket of the dark;” clouds covered the heaven; the moon had not risen to tinge them even with grey, and the sun had too long set to leave one faint streak of purple upon the edge of the western sky. Trees, houses, villages, fields, and gardens, all lay in one profound obscurity, and even the course of the high-road itself required eyes well-accustomed to night-travelling to be able to distinguish it, as it wandered on through a rich part of Hampshire, amidst alternate woods and meadows. Yet at that murky hour, a traveller on horseback rode forward upon his way, at an easy pace, and with a light heart, if one might judge by the snatches of homely ballads that broke from his lips as he trotted on. These might, indeed, afford a fallacious indication of what was going on within the breast, and in his case they did so; for habit is more our master than we know, and often rules our external demeanour, whenever the spirit is called to take council in the deep chambers within, showing upon the surface, without any effort on our part to hide our thoughts, a very different aspect from that of the mind’s business at the moment.

Thus, then, the traveller who there rode along, saluting the ear of night with scraps of old songs, sung in a low, but melodious voice, was as thoughtful, if not as sad, as it was in his nature to be; but yet, as that nature was a cheerful one and all his habits were gay, no sooner were the eyes of the spirit called to the consideration of deeper things, than custom exercised her sway over the animal part, and he gave voice, as we have said, to the old ballads which had cheered his boyhood and his youth.

Whatever were his contemplations, they were interrupted, just as he came to a small stream which crossed the road and then wandered along at its side, by first hearing the quick foot-falls of a horse approaching, and then a loud, but fine voice, exclaiming, “Who goes there?”

“A friend to all true men,” replied the traveller; “a foe to all false knaves. ‘Merry sings the throstle under the thorn.’ Which be you, friend of the highway?”

“Faith, I hardly know,” replied the stranger; “every man is a bit of both, I believe. But if you can tell me my way to Winchester, I will give you thanks.”

“I want nothing more,” answered the first traveller, drawing in his rein. “But Winchester!–Good faith, that is a long way off; and you are going from it, master:” and he endeavoured, as far as the darkness would permit, to gain some knowledge of the stranger’s appearance. It seemed that of a young man of good proportions, tall and slim, but with broad shoulders and long arms. He wore no cloak, and his dress fitting tight to his body, as was the fashion of the day, allowed his interlocutor to perceive the unencumbered outline of his figure.

“A long way off!” said the second traveller, as his new acquaintance gazed at him; “that is very unlucky; but all my stars are under that black cloud. What is to be done now, I wonder?”

“What do you want to do?” inquired the first traveller. “Winchester is distant five and twenty miles or more.”

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