The Romance of a Poor Young Man / A Drama Adapted from the French of Octave Feuillet

Produced by Charlene Taylor, Marilynda Fraser-Cunliffe and
the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at
http://www.pgdp.net (This file was produced from images
produced by the Wright American Fiction Project.)

THE STANDARD DRAMA.
The Acting Edition.
No. CCXXV.


THE ROMANCE OF

A POOR YOUNG MAN.

A Drama, adapted from the French of
OCTAVE FEUILLET,
BY MESSRS. PIERREPONT EDWARDS AND LESTER WALLACK.

TO WHICH ARE ADDED
A Description of the Costume—Cast of the Characters—Entrances and Exits—
Relative Positions of the Performers on the Stage, and
the whole of the Stage Business

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1859, by Lester Wallack, in the
Clerk’s Office of the District Court for the Southern District of New York.

NEW YORK:
SAMUEL FRENCH, PUBLISHER,
122 Nassau Street, (Up Stairs.)


CHARACTERS REPRESENTED.

Manuel, Marquis de Champcey,Mr. Lester Wallack.
Doctor Desmarets,—formerly of the French Army,Mr. Brougham.
M. de Bevannes—a man of the world,Mr. Walcot.
Gaspar Laroque—an aged man, formerly Captain of a Privateer,Mr. Dyott.
Alain—a confidential domestic,Mr. Young.
M. Nouret—a Notary,Mr. Levere.
Yvonnet—a Breton Shepherd,Mr. Baker.
Henri,Mr. Oliver.
Louis,Mr. Coburn.
Madame Laroque—Daughter-in-Law to Gaspar,Mrs. Vernon.
Marguerite—her daughter,Mrs. Hoey.
Mlle Helouin—a Governess,
Madame Aubrey—a relative of the Laroque family,Miss Mary Gannon.
Louise Vauberger—formerly nurse to Manuel, now keeper of a lodging house,Mrs. Walcot.
Christine—a Breton peasant girl,Miss Fanny Reeves.

Guests, Servants, Peasantry, &c., &c.

The events of the Drama take place (during the 1st Act) in Paris, afterward in the Province of Britanny.

Costumes of the present day.

The Overture, incidental Music, and Choruses composed and arranged by Mr. Robert Stoepel.


A POOR YOUNG MAN.


TABLEAU I.

A Room, simply furnished—Table, Chairs, Arm Chair, Secretaire, Side Table—Door C.

Madame Vauberger peeps in L.

Madame Vauberger. No; he has not yet returned. [Enters.] Things cannot go on in this manner much longer—I shall have to speak out, and plainly too. And why not? Surely he won’t take it ill from me—ah, no. I, who loved his poor mother so, could never—What’s this? A purse! empty! And this key, left carelessly lying about; that’s a bad sign. [Opens Secretaire.] No, not one solitary sous—his last coin came yesterday to pay me the rent. In the drawer, perhaps—

Dr. Desmarets looks in.

Dr. Desmarets. Hallo! [She starts.] What are you at there?

Mad. V. Me, sir? I was just—I was just—

Des. Poking your nose into that drawer—that what you call just?

Mad. V. I was dusting and putting the things in order, sir.

Des. I’ll tell you what, Madame V., you’re an extraordinary woman. Yesterday, when I called, you were dusting—half-an-hour ago when I called, you were dusting—and now, when I call again, you’re dusting. Where the devil you find so much dust to dust, I can’t think.

Mad. V. Ah, sir, look into this drawer.

Des. What for?

Mad. V. Is it not the place where, if one had money, one would naturally keep it?

Des. I suppose so. What of that?

Mad. V. See, sir, it is empty.

Des. What’s that to me?

Mad. V. And his purse, also.

Des. What’s that to you?

[Goes up and puts hat on table.

Mad. V. [Aside.] I dare not tell him that Manuel is without a meal—starving—I should never be forgiven. His pride would be wounded, and nothing could excuse that.

Des. Well, what are you cogitating about? Looking for something to dust?

Mad. V. I’m thinking of the Marquis, sir.

Des. Well, what of him?

Pages: First | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | ... | Next → | Last | Single Page