Abandoned

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EVERYMAN’S LIBRARY
EDITED BY ERNEST RHYS

FOR YOUNG PEOPLE

ABANDONED
BY JULES VERNE
FIFTY ILLUSTRATIONS


THE PUBLISHERS OF EVERYMAN’S LIBRARY WILL BE PLEASED TO SEND FREELY TO ALL APPLICANTS A LIST OF THE PUBLISHED AND PROJECTED VOLUMES TO BE COMPRISED UNDER THE FOLLOWING TWELVE HEADINGS:


TRAVEL     SCIENCE     FICTION
THEOLOGY & PHILOSOPHY
HISTORY     CLASSICAL
FOR YOUNG PEOPLE
ESSAYS     ORATORY
POETRY & DRAMA
BIOGRAPHY
ROMANCE


IN TWO STYLES OF BINDING, CLOTH, FLAT BACK, COLOURED TOP, AND LEATHER, ROUND CORNERS, GILT TOP.


London: J. M. DENT & CO.
New York: E. P. DUTTON & CO.


View larger image Front Cover THIS IS FAIRY GOLD, BOY; AND ‘TWILL PROVE SO.
SHAKESPEARE.

ABANDONED By JULES VERNE
Translated from the French By W. H. G. KINGSTON
LONDON: PUBLISHED by J. M. DENT & CO
AND IN NEW YORK BY E. P. DUTTON & CO


INTRODUCTION

The present romance, the second in the Mysterious Island triad, was originally issued in Paris with the title of L’Abandonné. Jules Verne’s list of stories already ran then to some twenty volumes—a number which has since grown to almost Dumasien proportions. L’Abandonné, like its two companion tales, ran its course as a serial through the Magasin Illustré of education and recreation, before its issue as a boy’s story-book. Its success in both forms seems to have established a record in the race for popularity and a circulation in both the French and English fields of current literature. The present book was translated into English by the late W. H. G. Kingston; and is printed in Everyman’s Library by special exclusive arrangement with Messrs. Sampson Low, Marston & Co., Ltd.

1909


The list of tales and favourite romances by Jules Verne includes the following:—

Five Weeks in a Balloon, 1870; A Journey to the Centre of the Earth, translated by J. V., 1872; tr. F. A. Malleson, 1876; Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea, 1873; tr. H. Frith, 1876; From the Earth to the Moon, and a Trip Round it, tr. Q. Mercier and E. G. King, 1873; The English at the North Pole, 1873; Meridiana: Adventures of Three English and Three Russians, 1873; Dr. Ox’s Experiment and other Stories, 1874; A Floating City, 1874; The Blockade Runners, 1874; Around the World in Eighty Days, tr. G. M. Towle and N. D’Anvers, 1874, 1876; tr. H. Frith, 1879; The Fur Country, or Seventy Degrees North Latitude, tr. N. D’Anvers, 1874; tr H. Frith, 1879; The Mysterious Island, tr. W. H. G. Kingston, 1875; The Survivors of the Chancellor: Diary of J. R. Kazallon, tr E. Frewer, 1875; Martin Paz, tr. E. Frewer, 1876; Field of Ice, 1876; Child of the Cavern, tr. W. H. G. Kingston, 1877, Michael Strogoff, tr. W. H. G. Kingston, 1877; A Voyage Round the World, 1877; Hector Senvadac, tr. E. Frewer, 1878; Dick Sands, the Boy Captain, tr. E. Frewer, 1879; Celebrated Travels and Travellers: The Great Navigators of the Eighteenth Century, tr. Dora Leigh, N. D’Anvers, etc., 1879-81; Tribulations of a Chinaman, tr. E. Frewer, 1880; The Begum’s Fortune, tr. W. H. G. Kingston, 1880; The Steam House, tr. A. D. Kingston, 1881; The Giant Raft, W. J. Gordon, 1881; Godfrey Morgan, 1883; The Green Ray, tr. M. de Hauteville, 1883; The Vanished Diamond, 1885; The Archipelago on Fire, 1886; Mathias Sandorf, 1886; Kérabân the Inflexible, 1887; The Lottery Ticket, 1887; Clipper of the Clouds, 1887; The Flight to France, or Memoirs of a Dragoon, 1888; North against South: Story of the American Civil War, 1888; Adrift in the Pacific, 1889; Cesar Cacabel, 1891; The Purchase of the North Pole, 1891; A Family without a Name, 1891; Mistress Branican, 1892; Claudius Bombarnac, 1894; Foundling Mick, 1895; Clovis Dardentor, 1897; For the Flag, tr. Mrs. C. Hoey, 1897; An Antarctic Mystery, 1898.

Jules Verne’s works are published in an authorised and illustrated edition by Messrs. Sampson Low, Marston & Co., Ltd.


CONTENTS

 PAGE
CHAPTER I
Conversation on the Subject of the Bullet—Construction of a Canoe—Hunting—At the Top of a Kauri—Nothing to attest the Presence of Man—Neb and Herbert’s Prize—Turning a Turtle—The Turtle disappears—Cyrus Harding’s Explanation1
CHAPTER II
First Trial of the Canoe—A Wreck on the Coast—Towing—Flotsam Point—Inventory of the Case: Tools, Weapons, Instruments, Clothes, Books, Utensils—What Pencroft misses—The Gospel—A Verse from the Sacred Book11
CHAPTER III
The Start—The rising Tide—Elms and different Plants—The Jacamar—Aspect of the Forest—Gigantic Eucalypti—The Reason they are called “Fever Trees”—Troops of Monkeys—A Waterfall—The Night Encampment23
CHAPTER IV
Journey to the Coast—Troops of Monkeys—A new River—The Reason the Tide was not felt—A woody Shore—ReptilePromontory—Herbert envies Gideon Spilett—Explosion of Bamboos34
CHAPTER V
Proposal to return by the Southern Shore—Configuration of the Coast—Searching for the supposed Wreck—A Wreck in the Air—Discovery of a small Natural Port—At Midnight on the Banks of the Mercy—The Canoe Adrift45
CHAPTER VI
Pencroft’s Halloos—A Night in the Chimneys—Herbert’s Arrows—The Captain’s Project—An unexpected Explanation—What has happened in Granite House—How a new Servant enters the Service of the Colonists58
CHAPTER VII
Plans—A Bridge over the Mercy—Mode adopted for making an Island of Prospect Heights—The Drawbridge—Harvest—The Stream—The Poultry-yard—A Pigeon-house—The two Onagas—The Cart—Excursion to Port Balloon70
CHAPTER VIII
Linen—Shoes of Seal-leather—Manufacture of Pyroxyle—Gardening —Fishing—Turtle-eggs—Improvement of Master Jup—The Corral—Musmon Hunt—New Animal and Vegetable Possessions—Recollections of their Native Land81
CHAPTER IX
Bad Weather—The Hydraulic Lift—Manufacture of Glass-ware—The Bread-tree—Frequent Visits to the Corral—Increase of the Flock—The Reporter’s Question—Exact Position of Lincoln Island—Pencroft’s Proposal92
CHAPTER X
Boat-building—Second Crop of Corn—Hunting Koalas—A new Plant, more Pleasant than Useful—Whale in Sight—A Harpoon from the Vineyard—Cutting up the Whale—Use for the Bones—End of the Month of May—Pencroft has nothing left to wish for103
CHAPTER XI
Winter—Felling Wood—The Mill—Pencroft’s fixed Idea—The Bones—To what Use an Albatross may be put—Fuel for the Future—Top and Jup—Storms—Damage to the Poultry-yard—Excursion to the Marsh—Cyrus Harding alone—Exploring the Well114
CHAPTER XII
The Rigging of the Vessel—An Attack from Foxes—Jup wounded—Jup cured—Completion of the Boat—Pencroft’s Triumph—The Bonadventure’s trial Trip to the South of the Island—An unexpected Document127
CHAPTER XIII
Departure decided upon—Conjectures—Preparations—The three Passengers—First Night—Second Night—Tabor Island—Searching the Shore—Searching the Wood—No one—Animals—Plants—A Dwelling—Deserted142
CHAPTER XIV
The Inventory—Night—A few Letters—Continuation of the Search—Plants and Animals—Herbert in great Danger—On Board—The Departure—Bad Weather—A Gleam of Reason—Lost on the Sea—A timely Light154
CHAPTER XV
The Return—Discussion—Cyrus Harding and the Stranger—Port Balloon—The Engineer’s Devotion—A touching Incident—Tears flow166
CHAPTER XVI
A Mystery to be cleared up—The Stranger’s first Words—Twelve Years on the Islet—Avowal which escapes him—The Disappearance—Cyrus Harding’s Confidence—Construction of a Mill—The first Bread—An Act of Devotion—Honest Hands176
CHAPTER XVII
Still alone—The Stranger’s Request—The Farm established at the Corral—Twelve Years ago—The Boatswain’s Mate of the Britannia—Left on Tabor Island—Cyrus Harding’s Hand—The mysterious Document191
CHAPTER XVIII
Conversation—Cyrus Harding and Gideon Spilett—An Idea of the Engineer’s—The Electric Telegraph—The Wires—The Battery—The Alphabet—Fine Season—Prosperity of the Colony—Photography—An Appearance of Snow—Two Years on Lincoln Island203
CHAPTER XIX
Recollections of their Native Land—Probable Future—Project for surveying the Coasts of the Island—Departure on the 16th of April—Sea-view of Reptile End—The basaltic Rocks of the Western Coast—Bad Weather—Night comes on—New Incident216
CHAPTER XX
A Night at Sea—Shark Gulf—Confidences—Preparations for Winter—Forwardness of the Bad Season—Severe Cold—Work in the Interior—In Six Months—A Photographic Negative—Unexpected Incident226

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS


THE ABANDONED

CHAPTER I

It was now exactly seven months since the balloon voyagers had been thrown on Lincoln Island. During that time, notwithstanding the researches they had made, no human being had been discovered. No smoke even had betrayed the presence of man on the surface of the island. No vestiges of his handiwork showed that either at an early or at a late period had man lived there. Not only did it now appear to be uninhabited by any but themselves, but the colonists were compelled to believe that it never had been inhabited. And now, all this scaffolding of reasonings fell before a simple ball of metal, found in the body of an inoffensive rodent! In fact, this bullet must have issued from a firearm, and who but a human being could have used such a weapon?

When Pencroft had placed the bullet on the table, his companions looked at it with intense astonishment. All the consequences likely to result from this incident, notwithstanding its apparent insignificance, immediately took possession of their minds. The sudden apparition of a supernatural being could not have startled them more completely.

Cyrus Harding did not hesitate to give utterance to the suggestions which this fact, at once surprising and unexpected, could not fail to raise in his mind. He took the bullet, turned it over and over, rolled it between his finger and thumb; then, turning to Pencroft, he asked,—

“Are you sure that the peccary wounded by this bullet was not more than three months old?”

“Not more, captain,” replied Pencroft. “It was still sucking its mother when I found it in the trap.”

“Well,” said the engineer, “that proves that within three months a gun-shot was fired in Lincoln Island.”

“And that a bullet,” added Gideon Spilett, “wounded, though not mortally, this little animal.”

“That is unquestionable,” said Cyrus Harding, “and these are the deductions which must be drawn from this incident: that the island was inhabited before our arrival, or that men have landed here within three months. Did these men arrive here voluntarily or involuntarily, by disembarking on the shore or by being wrecked? This point can only be cleared up later. As to what they were, Europeans or Malays, enemies or friends of our race, we cannot possibly guess; and if they still inhabit the island, or if they have left it, we know not. But these questions are of too much importance to be allowed to remain long unsettled.”

“No! a hundred times no! a thousand times no!” cried the sailor, springing up from the table. “There are no other men than ourselves on Lincoln Island! By my faith! The island isn’t large, and if it had been inhabited, we should have seen some of the inhabitants long before this!”

“In fact, the contrary would be very astonishing,” said Herbert.

“But it would be much more astonishing, I should think,” observed the reporter, “that this peccary should have been born with a bullet in its inside!”

“At least,” said Neb seriously, “if Pencroft has not had—”

“Look here, Neb,” burst out Pencroft. “Do you think I could have a bullet in my jaw for five or six months without finding it out? Where could it be hidden?” he asked opening his mouth to show the two-and-thirty teeth with which it was furnished. “Look well, Neb, and if you find one hollow tooth in this set, I will let you pull out half a dozen!”

“Neb’s supposition is certainly inadmissible,” replied Harding, who, notwithstanding the gravity of his thoughts, could not restrain a smile. “It is certain that a gun has been fired in the island, within three months at most. But I am inclined to think that the people who landed on this coast were only here a very short time ago, or that they just touched here; for if, when we surveyed the island from the summit of Mount Franklin, it had been inhabited, we should have seen them or we should have been seen ourselves. It is therefore probable that within only a few weeks castaways have been thrown by a storm on some part of the coast. However that may be, it is of consequence to us to have this point settled.”

“I think that we should act with caution,” said the reporter.

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