Europa’s Fairy Book

Produced by Sankar Viswanathan, David Edwards, and the
Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net
(This file was produced from images generously made
available by The Internet Archive)

 

“Do tell us a fairy tale, ganpa.”

“Well, will you be good and quiet if I do?”

“Of course we will; we are always good when you are telling us fairy tales.”

“Well, here goes.—Once upon a time, though it wasn’t in my time, and it wasn’t in your time, and it wasn’t in anybody else’s time, there was a——”

“But that would be no time at all.”

“That’s fairy tale time.”

 

 

Title Page

 

EUROPA’S
FAIRY BOOK

 

RESTORED AND RETOLD BY

 

JOSEPH JACOBS

 

DONE INTO PICTURES BY

JOHN D. BATTEN

 

 

 

 

G. P. PUTNAM’S SONS

NEW YORK AND LONDON

The Knickerbocker Press

 

 

 

Copyright, 1916

BY

JOSEPH JACOBS


To

Peggy, and Madge, and Pearl, and Maggie,
and Marguerite, and Peggotty, and Meg,
and Marjory, and Daisy, and Pegg, and

MARGARET HAYS

(How many granddaughters does that make?)

My Dear Little Peggy:—

Many, many, many years ago I wrote a book for your Mummey—when she was my little May—telling the fairy tales which the little boys and girls of England used to hear from their mummeys, who had heard them from their mummeys years and years and years before. My friend Mr. Batten made such pretty pictures for it—but of course you know the book—it has “Tom, Tit, Tot” and “The little old woman that went to market,” and all those tales you like. Now I have been making a fairy-tale book for your own self, and here it is. This time I have told, again the fairy tales that all the mummeys of Europe have been telling their little Peggys, Oh for ever so many years! They must have liked them because they have spread from Germany to Russia, from Italy to France, from Holland to Scotland, and from England to Norway, and from every country in Europe that you will read about in your geography to every other one. Mr. Batten, who made the pictures for your mummey’s book, has made some more for yours—isn’t it good of him when he has never seen you?

Though this book is your very, very own, you will not mind if other little girls and boys also get copies of it from their mummeys and papas and ganmas and ganpas, for when you meet some of them you will, all of you, have a number of common friends like “The Cinder-Maid,” or “The Earl of Cattenborough,” or “The Master-Maid,” and you can talk to one another about them so that you are old friends at once. Oh, won’t that be nice? And when one of these days you go over the Great Sea, in whatever land you go, you will find girls and boys, as well as grown-ups, who will know all of these tales, even if they have different names. Won’t that be nice too?

And when you tell your new friends here or abroad of these stories that you and they will know so well, do not forget to tell them that you have a book, all of your very own, which was made up specially for you of these old, old stories by your old, old

Ganpa.

P.S.—Do you hear me calling as I always do, “Peggy, Peggy”? Then you must answer as usual, “Ganpa, Ganpa.”


PREFACE

Ever since—almost exactly a hundred years ago—the Grimms produced their Fairy Tale Book, folk-lorists have been engaged in making similar collections for all the other countries of Europe, outside Germany, till there is scarcely a nook or a corner in the whole continent that has not been ransacked for these products of the popular fancy. The Grimms themselves and most of their followers have pointed out the similarity or, one might even say, the identity of plot and incident of many of these tales throughout the European Folk-Lore field. Von Hahn, when collecting the Greek and Albanian Fairy Tales in 1864, brought together these common “formulæ” of the European Folk-Tale. These were supplemented by Mr. S. Baring-Gould in 1868, and I myself in 1892 contributed an even fuller list to the Hand Book of Folk-Lore. Most, if not all of these formulæ, have been found in all the countries of Europe where folk-tales have been collected. In 1893 Miss M. Roalfe Cox brought together, in a volume of the Folk-Lore Society, no less than 345 variants of “Cinderella” and kindred stories showing how widespread this particular formula was throughout Europe and how substantially identical the various incidents as reproduced in each particular country.

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