Jack O’ Judgment

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JACK O’
JUDGMENT

 

BY

EDGAR WALLACE

 

 

WARD, LOCK & CO., LIMITED

LONDON AND MELBOURNE


 

Made and Printed in Great Britain by
Ward, Lock & Co., Limited, London.

 


 

JACK O’ JUDGMENT

 

 


POPULAR NOVELS
BY
EDGAR WALLACE
Published by
Ward, Lock & Co., Limited.
In Various Editions
———
SANDERS OF THE RIVER
BONES
BOSAMBO OF THE RIVER
BONES IN LONDON
THE KEEPERS OF THE KING’S PEACE
THE COUNCIL OF JUSTICE
THE DUKE IN THE SUBURBS
THE PEOPLE OF THE RIVER
DOWN UNDER DONOVAN
PRIVATE SELBY
THE ADMIRABLE CARFEW
THE MAN WHO BOUGHT LONDON
THE JUST MEN OF CORDOVA
THE SECRET HOUSE
KATE, PLUS TEN
LIEUTENANT BONES
THE ADVENTURES OF HEINE
JACK O’ JUDGMENT
THE DAFFODIL MYSTERY
THE NINE BEARS
THE BOOK OF ALL POWER
MR. JUSTICE MAXELL
THE BOOKS OF BART
THE DARK EYES OF LONDON
CHICK
SANDI, THE KING-MAKER
THE THREE OAK MYSTERY
THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE FROG
BLUE HAND
GREY TIMOTHY
A DEBT DISCHARGED
THOSE FOLK OF BULBORO’
THE MAN WHO WAS NOBODY
THE GREEN RUST
THE FOURTH PLAGUE
THE RIVER OF STARS

CONTENTS

  •       I.—THE KNAVE OF CLUBS
  •      II.—JACK O’ JUDGMENT—HIS CARD
  •     III.—THE DECOY
  •      IV.—THE MISSING HANSON
  •       V.—IN THE MAGISTRATE’S COURT
  •      VI.—STAFFORD KING RESIGNS
  •     VII.—THE COLONEL CONDUCTS HIS BUSINESS
  •    VIII.—THE LISTENER AT THE DOOR
  •      IX.—THE COLONEL EMPLOYS A DETECTIVE
  •       X.—THE GREEK PHILLOPOLIS
  •      XI.—THE COLONEL AT SCOTLAND YARD
  •     XII.—BUYING A NURSING HOME
  •    XIII.—THE LOVE OF STAFFORD KING
  •     XIV.—THE TAKING OF MAISIE WHITE
  •      XV.—THE COMMISSIONER HAS A THEORY
  •     XVI.—IN THE TURKISH BATHS
  •    XVII.—SOLOMON COMES BACK
  •   XVIII.—THE JUDGMENT OF DEATH
  •     XIX.—THE COLONEL IS SHOCKED
  •      XX.—”SWELL” CREWE BACKS OUT
  •     XXI.—THE BRIDE OF DEATH
  •    XXII.—MAISIE TELLS HER STORY
  •   XXIII.—THE GANG FUND
  •    XXIV.—PINTO GOES NORTH
  •     XXV.—A PATRON OF CHARITY
  •    XXVI.—THE SOLDIER WHO FOLLOWED
  •   XXVII.—THE CAPTURE OF “JACK”
  •  XXVIII.—THE PASSING OF PHILLOPOLIS
  •    XXIX.—THE VOICE IN THE ROOM
  •     XXX.—DIAMONDS FOR THE BANK
  •    XXXI.—THE VOICE AGAIN
  •   XXXII.—LOLLIE GOES AWAY
  •  XXXIII.—WHERE THE VOICE LIVED
  •   XXXIV.—CONSCIENCE MONEY
  •    XXXV.—IN A BOX AT THE ORPHEUM
  •   XXXVI.—LOLLIE PROPOSES
  •  XXXVII.—THE FALL OF PINTO
  • XXXVIII.—A USE FOR OLD FILMS
  •   XXXIX.—JACK O’ JUDGMENT REVEALED
  • ADVERTISEMENTS.

JACK O’ … JUDGMENT

 

CHAPTER I

THE KNAVE OF CLUBS

They picked up the young man called “Snow” Gregory from a Lambeth gutter, and he was dead before the policeman on point duty in Waterloo Road, who had heard the shots, came upon the scene.

He had been shot in his tracks on a night of snow and storm and none saw the murder.

When they got him to the mortuary and searched his clothes they found nothing except a little tin box of white powder which proved to be cocaine, and a playing card—the Jack of Clubs!

His associates had called him “Snow” Gregory because he was a doper, and cocaine is invariably referred to as “snow” by all its votaries. He was a gambler too, and he had been associated with Colonel Dan Boundary in certain of his business enterprises. That was all. The colonel knew nothing of the young man’s antecedents except that he had been an Oxford man who had come down in the world. The colonel added a few particulars designed, as it might seem to the impartial observer, to prove that he, the colonel, had ever been an uplifting quantity. (This colonelcy was an honorary title which he held by custom rather than by law.)

There were people who said that “Snow” Gregory, in his more exalted moments, talked too much for the colonel’s comfort, but people were very ready to talk unkindly of the colonel, whose wealth was an offence and a shame.

So they buried “Snow” Gregory, the unknown, and a jury of his fellow-countrymen returned a verdict of “Wilful murder against some person or persons unknown.”

And that was the end of a sordid tragedy, it seemed, until three months later there dawned upon Colonel Boundary’s busy life a brand new and alarming factor.

One morning there arrived at his palatial flat in Albemarle Place a letter. This he opened because it was marked “Private and Personal.” It was not a letter at all—as it proved—but a soiled and stained playing card, the Knave of Clubs.

He looked at the thing in perplexity, for the fate of his erstwhile assistant had long since passed from his mind. Then he saw writing on the margin of the card, and twisting it sideways read:

“JACK O’ JUDGMENT.”

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