A Apple Pie and Other Nursery Tales

Produced by Jacqueline Jeremy, Janet Blenkinship and the
Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net
(This file was produced from images generously made
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A

APPLE PIE

AND

OTHER NURSERY TALES.

FORTY-EIGHT PAGES OF ILLUSTRATIONS

PRINTED IN COLOURS BY
KRONHEIM & Co.

LONDON AND NEW YORK:
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS.

THE CATS’ TEA PARTY.

CONTENTS.

THE HISTORY OF
A
APPLE PIE.

AApple Pie.
BBit it.
CCut it.
DDealt it.
EEat it.
FFought for it.
GGot it.
HHid it.
JJoined it.
KKept it.
LLonged for it.
MMourned for it.
N nodded at it. O opened it. P peeped at it.

N nodded at it. O opened it. P peeped at it.

NNodded at it.
OOpened it.
PPeeped at it.
 Q quartered it. R ran for it. S stole it.

Q quartered it. R ran for it. S stole it.

QQuartered it.
RRan for it.
SStole it.
T took it. V viewed it. W wanted it. T took it. V viewed it. W wanted it.
TTook it.
VViewed it.
WWanted it.
X Y Z & Amperse and All wished for a piece in hand. X Y Z & Amperse and
All wished for a piece in hand.
XYZ&
Amperse and
All wished for
A piece in hand.

MISS PUSSYCAT’S TEA PARTY.

Miss Tabitha Pussycat was a quiet, sleek, old creature, and was so prim, that her friends called her an old maid; and some of them even said that she was an old cat, but they were the people who were not asked to her nice tea parties. When she gave a tea party, she sent her page Jacko to invite her friends. Jacko was a clever monkey, who had come from his last place at the Zoological Gardens, where he had been used to see a great deal of company.

One day Miss Tabitha made up her mind to have a larger party than usual, so she sent out for a dish of pink shrimps, a bag of muffins, a tea-cake, a new French loaf, and a pound of fresh butter. Then she sent Jacko out in his new coat to invite her friends.

Mr. Velvet-Purr and other visitors arrive at Miss Tabitha's. Mr. Velvet-Purr and other visitors arrive at Miss Tabitha’s.

First, there was Mr. Velvet Purr, a quiet old bachelor, who sat nearly all day in the sun on a garden seat watching the birds, but who was much too well fed to catch mice. Miss Velveteen Purr, his sister, went with him, she was a very pretty singer, wore a fur tippet, and drank a good deal of milk to soften her voice.

Sir Claude Scratch was a very different person. He was proud of his high family, for his father was second cousin to Dick Whittington’s Cat, and had seen a great deal of the world. Sir Claude was very proud of his whiskers, and before he went to the tea party, he called on Frizzle Frog, the barber, to be shaved. While he sat there, with the towel under his chin, who should look in, but his friend Captain Black, a very fierce looking fellow, who had killed hundreds of rats, and was always ready to fight. He was a great favourite of the ladies, and said he would go to tea though he had not been invited.

Sir Claude Scratch calls on Frizzle Frog Sir Claude Scratch calls on Frizzle Frog the barber, and while he is being shaved, Captain Black drops in.

The four Misses White were already on their way to Miss Pussycat’s house in their clean stockings, and the nice silky dresses that their mother had given them. Old Mrs. White lived at the baker’s round the corner, and her daughters’ names were Fluffy, Tibby, Titty, and Tip; all of them famous for their beautiful skins and their bright eyes. You may be sure that the four Masters Tortoise Shell were waiting for them, for they had been ready all the afternoon, with their tail-coats on, for the purpose of walking with these charming young ladies. They were very young gentlemen, so that they were quite proud at being asked.

It was a very grand tea table, and when all the party sat down it was more than Jacko could do to wait upon them,—but the gentlemen handed the tea to the ladies, and picked out the largest shrimps for the Misses White, and nearly emptied the cream jug for Miss Velvet Purr, and helped themselves to muffins, and were very merry indeed.

Captain Black was so attentive that he would hand round the bread and butter. He took the plate from under the very nose of Sir Claude Scratch, which made that person so angry, that nothing but a smile from Miss Tabitha would please him.

Miss Velvet-Purr sings a song, which is much admired. Miss Velvet-Purr sings a song, which is much admired.

After tea Miss Purr was asked to sing, and when she had taken another sip of milk she said she would give them an old song with variations. It was called Moll Rowdy, and the accompaniment was by Spitz, and everybody said that there never was anything more striking. Then Miss Tabitha, who had a very fine ear, gave them a little French song which had a chorus of Tant Mieux, and they all joined in, Captain Black and Mr. Velvet Purr singing the bass. Then the Captain told a story of his travels to the Isle of Dogs, and Sir Claude related an adventure at St. Kitts, which set them all laughing.

But the great fun of the evening was when the four Masters Tortoise Shell, whose names were Bobstay, Rattle, Clipper, and Dick, came into the room with great white collars and black faces, and began to sing like the Ethiopian Serenaders. Bobstay played the Fiddle, Rattle the Bones, Clipper the Banjo, and Dick the Tambourine, when they sang “Old Dan Tucker,” and “Kafoozlum.” The four Misses White almost fell off their seats with laughing, and Sir Claude was seen to put the tail of his coat into his mouth; Captain Black didn’t like it much, for he had a dark complexion and thought they were laughing at him.

But the great fun of the evening But the great fun of the evening was when the four Masters Tortoise Shell appeared as Ethiopian Serenaders.

At last it was time for them to be going, and Mr. Velvet Purr who was very careful not to be out too late, brushed his coat in the hall, and said good night. Captain Black smoothed his fur jacket; Sir Claude Scratch stroked his whiskers, and the ladies began to arrange their dress for walking. Then there was such a fuss as they all said “Good-bye,” that some of the neighbours looked out of window to see what was the matter; especially as Captain Black and Sir Claude quarrelled and fought in the street. At last, however, all the party got safely home.

Departure of the Guests. Departure of the Guests. Captain Black and Sir Claude Scratch quarrel in the street.

THIS LITTLE PIG WENT TO MARKET.

THIS LITTLE PIG

THIS

LITTLE

PIG

WENT TO MARKET.

WENT

TO

MARKET

THIS

LITTLE

PIG

STAYED

AT

HOME,

THIS

LITTLE

PIG

HAD

ROAST

BEEF,

THIS

LITTLE

PIG

HAD

NONE.

THIS

LITTLE

PIG

CRIED

WEE!

WEE!

ALL

THE

WAY

HOME.

NURSERY RHYMES.

II.

THE THREE BEARS.

In a far-off country there was once a little girl, who was called Silver-Locks, because her curly hair shone so very brightly. But she was not so good as she was pretty, for she was a sad romp, and so restless that she could not be kept quiet at home, and would often run out when she was told not to do so. One day, she started off into a wood, to gather wild flowers and to chase butterflies. She ran here, and ran there, and went so far, at last, that she found herself in quite a lonely place, and there she saw a snug little house, in which three Bears lived; but they were not then at home. The door and the parlour window being open, Silver-Locks peeped in, and soon found the place was empty; so the saucy puss made up her mind to go in boldly, and look all about the place, little thinking what sort of folks lived there.

Little Silverlocks enters the Bears' dwelling. Little Silverlocks enters the Bears’ dwelling.

Now the three Bears had gone out to take a walk, a little while before this. The biggest of them was the Papa Bear, who had a very rough coat, and was named Mr. Bruin. The next Bear in size was his wife, called Mammy Muff, from her smooth skin; and the smallest of the three was their little darling, Tiny. Before going out, Mammy Muff put the nice soup she had made for dinner on a great chest in the parlour to cool; as they were very hungry, they meant to be back in a short time.

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