The Yacht Club; or, The Young Boat-Builder

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YACHT CLUB SERIES
Miss Nellie Patterdale and Don John. Frontispiece. Miss Nellie Patterdale and Don John. Frontispiece.


THE YACHT CLUB SERIES.


THE YACHT CLUB;

OR,

THE YOUNG BOAT-BUILDER.

BY

OLIVER OPTIC,

AUTHOR OF “YOUNG AMERICA ABROAD,” “THE ARMY AND NAVY SERIES,”
“THE WOODVILLE STORIES,” “THE STARRY FLAG SERIES,” “THE
BOAT CLUB STORIES,” “THE LAKE SHORE SERIES,”
“THE UPWARD AND ONWARD SERIES,”
ETC., ETC.

WITH THIRTEEN ILLUSTRATIONS.

BOSTON:
LEE AND SHEPARD, PUBLISHERS.
NEW YORK:
LEE, SHEPARD AND DILLINGHAM.


Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1873,
By WILLIAM T. ADAMS,
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.

Brown Type-Setting Machine Company.

TO

MY YOUNG FRIEND

CHARLES H. HASTINGS,

OF NEW YORK,

This Book is Affectionately Dedicated.


The Yacht Club Series.


1. LITTLE BOBTAIL; or, The Wreck of the Penobscot.

2. THE YACHT CLUB; or, The Young Boat-builder.

3. MONEY-MAKER; or, The Victory of the Basilisk.

4. THE COMING WAVE; or, The Hidden Treasure of High Rock.

5. THE DORCAS CLUB; or, Our Girls Afloat.

(The sixth in preparation.)

PREFACE.

The Yacht Club” is the second volume of the Yacht Club Series, to which it gives a name; and like its predecessor, is an independent story. The hero has not before appeared, though some of the characters of “Little Bobtail” take part in the incidents: but each volume may be read understandingly without any knowledge of the contents of the other. In this story, the interest centres in Don John, the Boat-builder, who is certainly a very enterprising young man, though his achievements have been more than paralleled in the domain of actual life.

Like the first volume of the series, the incidents of the story transpire on the waters of the beautiful Penobscot Bay, and on its shores. They include several yacht races, which must be more interesting to those who are engaged in the exciting sport of yachting, than to others. But the principal incidents are distinct from the aquatic narrative; and those who are not interested in boats and boating will find that Don John and Nellie Patterdale do not spend all their time on the water.

The hero is a young man of high aims and noble purposes: and the writer believes that it is unpardonable to awaken the interest and sympathy of his readers for any other than high-minded and well-meaning characters. But he is not faultless; he makes some grave mistakes, even while he has high aims. The most important lesson in morals to be derived from his experience is that it is unwise and dangerous for young people to conceal their actions from their parents and friends; and that men and women who seek concealment “choose darkness because their deeds are evil.”

Harrison Square, Boston,
May 22, 1873.


CONTENTS.

 PAGE
CHAPTER I.
Don John of Belfast, and Friends11
CHAPTER II.
About the Tin Box28
CHAPTER III.
The Yacht Club at Turtle Head46
CHAPTER IV.
A Sad Event in the Ramsay Family63
CHAPTER V.
Captain Shivernock81
CHAPTER VI.
Donald gets the Job99
CHAPTER VII.
Laying down the Keel.117
CHAPTER VIII.
The First Regatta.135
CHAPTER IX.
The Skylark and the Sea Foam.153
CHAPTER X.
The Launch of the Maud.171
CHAPTER XI.
The White Cross of Denmark.189
CHAPTER XII.
Donald answers Questions.207
CHAPTER XIII.
Moonlight on the Juno.226
CHAPTER XIV.
Captain Shivernock’s Joke.244
CHAPTER XV.
Laud Cavendish takes Care of Himself.264
CHAPTER XVI.
Saturday Cove.283
CHAPTER XVII.
The Great Race.302
CHAPTER XVIII.
The Hasbrook Outrage, and other Matters.320


THE YACHT CLUB;

OR,

THE YOUNG BOAT-BUILDER.


CHAPTER I.

DON JOHN OF BELFAST, AND FRIENDS.

“Why, Don John, how you frightened me!” exclaimed Miss Nellie Patterdale, as she sprang up from her reclining position in a lolling-chair.

It was an intensely warm day near the close of June, and the young lady had chosen the coolest and shadiest place she could find on the piazza of her father’s elegant mansion in Belfast. She was as pretty as she was bright and vivacious, and was a general favorite among the pupils of the High School, which she attended. She was deeply absorbed in the reading of a story in one of the July magazines, which had just come from the post-office, when she heard a step near her. The sound startled her, it was so near; and, looking up, she discovered the young man whom she had spoken to close beside her. He was not Don John of Austria, but Donald John Ramsay of Belfast, who had been addressed by his companions simply as Don, a natural abbreviation of his first name, until he of Austria happened to be mentioned in the history recitation in school, when the whole class looked at Don, and smiled; some of the girls even giggled, and got a check for it; but the republican young gentleman became a titular Spanish hidalgo from that moment. Though he was the son of a boat-builder, by trade a ship carpenter, he was a good-looking, and gentlemanly fellow, and was treated with kindness and consideration by most of the sons and daughters of the wealthy men of Belfast, who attended the High School. It was hardly a secret that Don John regarded Miss Nellie with especial admiration, or that, while he was polite to all the young ladies, he was particularly so to her. It is a fact, too, that he blushed when she turned her startled gaze upon him on the piazza; and it is just as true that Miss Nellie colored deeply, though it may have been only the natural consequence of her surprise.

“I beg your pardon, Nellie; I did not mean to frighten you,” replied Donald.

“I don’t suppose you did, Don John; but you startled me just as much as though you had meant it,” added she, with a pleasant smile, so forgiving that the young man had no fear of the consequences. “How terribly hot it is! I am almost melted.”

“It is very warm,” answered Donald, who, somehow or other, found it very difficult to carry on a conversation with Nellie; and his eyes seemed to him to be twice as serviceable as his tongue.

“It is dreadful warm.”

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