The Lock and Key Library: The Most Interesting Stories of All Nations: North Europe — Russian — Swedish — Danish — Hungarian

This etext was prepared by Donald Lainson, charlie@idirect.com.

The Lock and Key Library

The Most Interesting Stories of All Nations

Edited by Julian Hawthorne

North Europe—Russian—Swedish—Danish—Hungarian

Table of Contents

ALEXANDER SERGEIEVITCH PUSHKIN

The Queen of Spades

VERA JELIHOVSKY

The General’s Will

FEODOR MIKHAILOVITCH DOSTOYEVSKY

Crime and Punishment

ANTON CHEKHOFF

The Safety Match

VSEVOLOD VLADIMIROVITCH KRESTOVSKI

Knights of Industry

JORGEN WILHELM BERGSOE

The Amputated Arms

OTTO LARSSEN

The Manuscript

BERNHARD SEVERIN INGEMANN

The Sealed Room

STEEN STEENSEN BLICHER

The Rector of Veilbye

HUNGARIAN MYSTERY STORIES

FERENCZ MOLNAR

The Living Death

MAURUS JOKAI

Thirteen at Table

ETIENNE BARSONY

The Dancing Bear

ARTHUR ELCK

The Tower Room

Russian Mystery Stories

Alexander Sergeievitch Pushkin

The Queen of Spades

I

There was a card party at the rooms of Naroumoff, of the Horse
Guards. The long winter night passed away imperceptibly, and it
was five o’clock in the morning before the company sat down to
supper. Those who had won ate with a good appetite; the others sat
staring absently at their empty plates. When the champagne
appeared, however, the conversation became more animated, and all
took a part in it.

“And how did you fare, Souirin?” asked the host.

“Oh, I lost, as usual. I must confess that I am unlucky. I play
mirandole, I always keep cool, I never allow anything to put me
out, and yet I always lose!”

“And you did not once allow yourself to be tempted to back the red?

Your firmness astonishes me.”

“But what do you think of Hermann?” said one of the guests,
pointing to a young engineer. “He has never had a card in his hand
in his life, he has never in his life laid a wager; and yet he sits
here till five o’clock in the morning watching our play.”

“Play interests me very much,” said Hermann, “but I am not in the
position to sacrifice the necessary in the hope of winning the
superfluous.”

“Hermann is a German; he is economical—that is all!” observed
Tomsky. “But if there is one person that I cannot understand, it
is my grandmother, the Countess Anna Fedorovna!”

“How so?” inquired the guests.

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