Fruitfulness

Produced by David Widger and Dagny

FRUITFULNESS

(FECONDITE)

By Emile Zola

Translated and edited by Ernest Alfred Vizetelly



TRANSLATOR’S PREFACE

“FRUITFULNESS” is the first of a series of four works in which M. Zola proposes to embody what he considers to be the four cardinal principles of human life. These works spring from the previous series of The Three Cities: “Lourdes,” “Rome,” and “Paris,” which dealt with the principles of Faith, Hope, and Charity. The last scene in “Paris,” when Marie, Pierre Froment’s wife, takes her boy in her arms and consecrates him, so to say, to the city of labor and thought, furnishes the necessary transition from one series to the other. “Fruitfulness,” says M. Zola, “creates the home. Thence springs the city. From the idea of citizenship comes that of the fatherland; and love of country, in minds fed by science, leads to the conception of a wider and vaster fatherland, comprising all the peoples of the earth. Of these three stages in the progress of mankind, the fourth still remains to be attained. I have thought then of writing, as it were, a poem in four volumes, in four chants, in which I shall endeavor to sum up the philosophy of all my work. The first of these volumes is ‘Fruitfulness’; the second will be called ‘Work’; the third, ‘Truth’; the last, ‘Justice.’ In ‘Fruitfulness’ the hero’s name is Matthew. In the next work it will be Luke; in ‘Truth,’ Mark; and in ‘justice,’ John. The children of my brain will, like the four Evangelists preaching the gospel, diffuse the religion of future society, which will be founded on Fruitfulness, Work, Truth, and Justice.”

This, then, is M. Zola’s reply to the cry repeatedly raised by his hero, Abbe Pierre Froment, in the pages of “Lourdes,” “Paris,” and “Rome”: “A new religion, a new religion!” Critics of those works were careful to point out that no real answer was ever returned to the Abbe’s despairing call; and it must be confessed that one must yet wait for the greater part of that answer, since “Fruitfulness,” though complete as a narrative, forms but a portion of the whole. It is only after the publication of the succeeding volumes that one will be able to judge how far M. Zola’s doctrines and theories in their ensemble may appeal to the requirements of the world.

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